Medical

Lightweighted patient transport system gives emergency personnel a lift

By Norbert Sparrow
Published: April 16th, 2014

Thermoset composites are making the lives of emergency medical services (EMS) personnel a little less strainful. The new iN∫X (pronounced "in-ex") Integrated Patient Transport and Loading System from Ferno EMS integrates 16 parts supplied by The Composites Group (TCG; Highland Heights, OH) that achieved weight reductions compared with conventional components without adversely affecting strength. EMS workers routinely sustain sprains and strains, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Chinese regulators crack down on noncompliant medical products

By Norbert Sparrow
Published: April 15th, 2014

We talk a lot about China as the world's factory, manufacturing and assembling goods for export, but the domestic market is equally worthy of our attention, as the country's urban population becomes avid consumers. The leading edge of this consumerized society is a burgeoning middle class—larger in size than the entire population of the United States—and it is demanding access to quality healthcare.

NYC to host largest medical design and manufacturing event on East Coast

By PlasticsToday Staff
Published: April 15th, 2014

More than 500 international exhibitors and scores of networking and learning opportunities await visitors to MD&M East, which returns to the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York, NY, on June 10 to 12, 2014. The event is co-located with PLASTEC East.

American firm localizes specialty compound production in China

By PlasticsToday Staff
Published: April 14th, 2014

Global OEMs concerned the legitimacy of their plastic compound sources in China may want to consider a new supplier of specialty products with its roots in the US.

Slideshow: Five ways 3D printing is revolutionizing medical technology, part five

By Norbert Sparrow
Published: April 14th, 2014

Intricately patterned 3D tissue constructs with multiple types of cells and blood vessels have been produced using a bioprinting technique developed by researchers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. The work represents a major step forward in creating human tissues to test drug safety and effectiveness ex vivo. It also is an early step toward building functional replacements for injured or diseased tissue at the push of a button, according to the researchers.

Slideshow: Five ways 3D printing is revolutionizing medical technology, part four

By Norbert Sparrow
Published: April 14th, 2014

Because aortic aneurysms develop through an intricate interplay of environmental and genetic factors, they have been difficult to study both clinically and experimentally. The use of 3D printing to model aortic aneurysms at the University of Rochester represents a breakthrough for researchers seeking to study the disease. Speaking with sister publication MPMN, Ankur Chandra, associate professor of surgery and biomedical engineering at the university and a practicing vascular surgeon, explained the process.

Slideshow: Five ways 3D printing is revolutionizing medical technology, part three

By Norbert Sparrow
Published: April 14th, 2014

A bionic suit developed by Ekso Bionics (Richmond, CA) is designed to help individuals with any amount of lower extremity weakness, including people with spinal cord injuries, to stand up and walk. The company recently partnered with 3D Systems to custom print components for an exoskeleton that enabled paralyzed skier Amanda Boxtel to walk again for the first time since injuring her spinal cord in a skiing accident 20 years ago.

Slideshow: Five ways 3D printing is revolutionizing medical technology, part two

By Norbert Sparrow
Published: April 14th, 2014

Bioprinting functioning human organs is still a ways off, but the technology is advancing rapidly, thanks to companies such as Organovo (San Diego, CA). The company has been making headlines for its bioprinting technology that enables the creation of 3D tissues that function in native ways without the use of artificial materials. Pharmaceuticals companies see vast potential in the technology for drug discovery.

Slideshow: Five ways 3D printing is revolutionizing medical technology

By Norbert Sparrow
Published: April 14th, 2014

We recently reported on a blood recyling device developed and marketed by British company Brightwake Ltd. that made extensive use of 3D printing to produce prototype parts. The technology resulted in tremendous cost savings and accelerated time to market, according to the firm.

3D printing reduces cost, speeds time to market for blood recycling system

By Norbert Sparrow
Published: April 14th, 2014

A blood recycling system prototype that uses a number of parts made with the Stratasys Dimension 1200es 3D printer has received the CE mark, enabling the finished device to be placed on the market in European Union member states and other countries that recognize the marking. Developed by Brightwake Ltd. (Nottingham, UK), Hemosep significantly reduces the need for blood transfusions. One of the first patients to benefit from the device was a 50-year-old UK heart patient, who, as a Jehovah’s Witness, requested not to receive donated blood products.

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