Biodurable and bioabsorbable: Medical implant polymers pose unique challenges

By PlasticsToday Staff
Published: January 13th, 2012

Talk about threading the properties needle: biodegradable and biodurable polymers for implantable medical devices have the unenviable task of precisely controlling how they do or don't break down in the most sensitive environment of all-the human body.

Using more science to eliminate “compostable” hype

By Clare Goldsberry
Published: January 13th, 2012

In a move that promises to elevate the level of scientific testing to the compostable or debate, the Biodegradable Products Institute (BPI) has selected NSF International, a global independent public health organization, to administer the BPI's Certified Compostable program.  NSF International is a global third-party, independent certification organization that will accept and review certification requests

Borealis promotes clarified PP as a replacement for PC

By PlasticsToday Staff
Published: January 13th, 2012

Borealis has launched a more transparent extrusion blowmolding grade of polypropylene (PP) specifically designed for cosmetics and baby bottles, with an eye on capturing market share forsaken by polycarbonate (PC), which continues to deal with concerns around bisphenol A (BPA).

The company said its Borclear RC737MO offers a "leap forward" in aesthetics by influencing the gloss, haze and clarity of bottles.

Telles tale ends

By Karen Laird
Published: January 13th, 2012

Metabolix Inc., a bioscience company focused on developing clean, sustainable solutions for plastics, chemicals and energy, and the Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM) have announced that they are ending the Telles, LLC joint venture for PHA bioplastics as per February 8, 2012.

More starch-filled PP options for auto use

By PlasticsToday Staff
Published: January 12th, 2012

Two new grades of polypropylene incorporating encapsulating starch particles will be released to the market by Cereplast, Inc. (El Segundo, CA) during the first half of 2012 in the United States and Europe.

Gloucester sees increased demand for retrofit blown film lines

By Heather Caliendo
Published: January 12th, 2012

Sometimes what's old is new again; at least that's the case for Gloucester Engineering Co.

Gloucester President Carl Johnson told PlasticsToday the company has seen an increase in demand for its retrofit blown film business.

"Companies, particularly in the U.S., are trying to squeeze every ounce of plastic they can out of their existing assets," he said. "They are also trying to increase their product flexibility, enhance quality, with minimal capital investment."

Precision assembly includes molded part and extruded silicone

By Doug Smock
Published: January 12th, 2012

A precision assembly is helping ease incontinence and other medical problems caused by a variety of gynecologic conditions, including prolapse.

Engineers at MedPlast (Elkhorn, WI) developed a new approach to a product called pessary balloons that includes a molded part, a check ball and a glued-on silicone extrusion.

French-Korean collaboration targets vehicle interior decorative film development

By PlasticsToday Staff
Published: January 11th, 2012

Vehicle interior systems supplier Faurecia (Nanterre, France) and Korea's LG Hausys (Seoul), a world leader in the development and production of specialty decoration materials and films for the housing, electronic and automotive industries, have signed a strategic partnership to jointly develop next-generation vehicle interior decoration films.

Rohrer CEO discusses thermoforming acquisition

By Heather Caliendo
Published: January 11th, 2012

Rohrer Corp. hopes to build a better package with its recent acquisition of Buckell Plastic Co.

"Rohrer is searching for well-run companies to expand its capacity and capabilities," he said. "Buckell fits this profile and was ready to make a deal," Rohrer Corp. president and CEO Scot Adkins told PlasticsToday.

It's an uphill fight to replace PVC in medical tubing

By Doug Smock
Published: January 11th, 2012

Teknor Apex, one of the world's largest compounders of flexible PVC, is actively developing a PVC-free alternative for medical applications and already reports a handful of commercial applications in smaller sizes.

Replacing PVC in medical applications is a daunting task because of the low cost of PVC compounds, the large infrastructure in place for manufacturing the material, and the regulatory review process required.

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