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In an age when manufactured components are heading into the realm of the micro and even nano scale, quality assurance is becoming challenging. Werth Inc. (Old Saybrook, CT), a supplier of dimensional measurement technology instruments and optics, has a new solution. The Werth Fiber Probe (WFP) has opened up the world of microstructures for tactile coordinate metrology.

Clare Goldsberry

July 7, 2015

1 Min Read
Werth 3D Fiber Probe measures ‘around the corner'

In an age when manufactured components are heading into the realm of the micro and even nano scale, quality assurance is becoming challenging. Werth Inc. (Old Saybrook, CT), a supplier of dimensional measurement technology instruments and optics, has a new solution. The Werth Fiber Probe (WFP) has opened up the world of microstructures for tactile coordinate metrology.

werth-fiber-probe-350.jpgLow contact forces of less than one millinewton and small probe spheres down to 20 microns in diameter make the 3D WFP suitable for use on precision-engineered components and on sensitive surfaces.

This capability previously was available only with straight probe pins, said the company. The L-probes now available can measure undercuts, small side bores and even internal threads.

The L-probes have sphere diameters from 0.040 to 0.250 mm. The standard offset between the probe sphere and shaft is about 1.5mm; other offsets are also available.

With modular control and software integration, the new Werth Fiber Probe can be used in scanning or single-point mode. To take advantage of the precision of the sensor, it is recommended for use with high-precision machines, such as the VideoCheck UA, and with a 3D maximum permissible error down to 300 nanometers.

About the Author(s)

Clare Goldsberry

Until she retired in September 2021, Clare Goldsberry reported on the plastics industry for more than 30 years. In addition to the 10,000+ articles she has written, by her own estimation, she is the author of several books, including The Business of Injection Molding: How to succeed as a custom molder and Purchasing Injection Molds: A buyers guide. Goldsberry is a member of the Plastics Pioneers Association. She reflected on her long career in "Time to Say Good-Bye."

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