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K 2013: New PET recycling process promises significant savings

Dusseldorf - Liquid state polycondensation (LSP) is the way ahead for recycling of industrial and post consumer PET materials, according to recycling system supplier NGR Next Generation Recycling (9D/05).

October 21, 2013

1 Min Read
K 2013: New PET recycling process promises significant savings

Dusseldorf - Liquid state polycondensation (LSP) is the way ahead for recycling of industrial and post consumer PET materials, according to recycling system supplier NGR Next Generation Recycling (9D/05).

"Compared with the commonly used solid state polycondensation process where the PET material is maintained at an elevated temperature for several hours under vacuum in order to achieve the desired increase in IV value through polycondensation and remove contaminants, the LSP achieves a similar rise in the space of minutes," says company CEO Josef Hochreiter. "The challenge in developing the LSP process was finding the exact point where the optimum reaction takes place."

NGR CEO Josef Hochreiter (left) explains the benefits of liquid state polycondensation of PET reclaim.

"We are not sure of the exact level of energy savings that will be possible with the LSP process, but we expect them to be significant," adds Hochreiter. "The equipment also occupies 70% less space."

NGR is currently operating a pilot plant with capacity of 380 kg/hour to validate the process. Field testing of the process will start early next year, with full commercial deployment of the process expected in the first quarter of 2015.

Extensive field testing of the process will start early next year, with full commercial deployment of the process expected in the first quarter of 2015. "We want to develop [the process] to a high degree before we go commercial," says Hochreiter. The LSP process supports the processing of PET from industrial waste, including fibers, bottles, preforms, and films, as well as washed PET post-consumers flakes.

NGR is currently seeking regulatory approval for food grade applications with the relevant authorities, and expects the process to be a formality.

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