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In keeping with its strategic plan of vertical integration of services, Mack Molding announced at the MD&M/Plastec West shows that it had invested $1 million in Q4 2010 to implement a full-service machining center at its headquarters plant in Arlington, VT.

Clare Goldsberry

February 14, 2011

2 Min Read
Mack Molding increases integration, adds full-service machining center

In keeping with its strategic plan of vertical integration of services, Mack Molding announced at the MD&M/Plastec West shows that it had invested $1 million in Q4 2010 to implement a full-service machining center at its headquarters plant in Arlington, VT.

"The growing demand for milling and turning work, combined with our drive to further compress lead times for our customers, made this a very easy decision," said Jeff Somple, president of Mack's Northern Operations. "As a growing supplier to the medical device and orthopedic markets, we see a lot of opportunity for this service."

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Mack Molding’s new Machining Center will focus on small, complex parts with high length-to-diameter ratios.

Several years ago, Mack added sheet metal fabrication to its contract manufacturing services, and it says that business has grown nicely. The addition of milling, turning, and machining gives Mack extended capabilities for the fabrication of small, complex metal components for the medical industry, as well as for other markets it serves.

The primary equipment purchased includes a Mazak Integrex Mark IV turning and machining center, and two Citizen A20VII lathes. "The Integrex is the workhorse," said David Hoffman, CNC supervisor, who is heading up Mack's new Machining Center. "With its advanced multitasking technology, it can perform high-powered turning and full-function machining in a single setup. This reduces lead time for our customers and allows us to produce small lot sizes in a cost-efficient manner."

Mack says part accuracy is also improved using the Integrex by eliminating multiple setups. The Integrex is equipped with a 40-tool magazine, a touch probe tool setter, KM63 dual-contact tool connection, 2-inch thru-capacity, and an LNS Servo 65 bar feeder.

The Citizen Swiss lathes are seven-axis, 20-mm machines with 21 tools each. Equipped with an additional axis on the subspindle, they can machine on both the front and back ends of a workpiece simultaneously. Auxiliary equipment includes ultrasonic parts washing, vibratory tumble deburring, a 14-inch optical comparator, and a surface finish analyzer.

Mack's machining center has management staff in place, with plans for 10-15 additional employees as the service grows to a two-shift operation. —Clare Goldsberry

About the Author(s)

Clare Goldsberry

Until she retired in September 2021, Clare Goldsberry reported on the plastics industry for more than 30 years. In addition to the 10,000+ articles she has written, by her own estimation, she is the author of several books, including The Business of Injection Molding: How to succeed as a custom molder and Purchasing Injection Molds: A buyers guide. Goldsberry is a member of the Plastics Pioneers Association. She reflected on her long career in "Time to Say Good-Bye."

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