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As the U.S. political establishment continues to debate the merits of the Iran nuclear deal largely along partisan lines, the world's business community is united in seeing new opportunities in the region's second largest economy, after Saudi Arabia (and that was in 2014, when trade sanctions were in place).

Norbert Sparrow

September 23, 2015

2 Min Read
Messe Düsseldorf makes deal with Iran Plast

As the U.S. political establishment continues to debate the merits of the Iran nuclear deal largely along partisan lines, the world's business community is united in seeing new opportunities in the region's second largest economy, after Saudi Arabia (and that was in 2014, when trade sanctions were in place).

Iran map

Image courtesy Tuomas Lehtinen/freedigitalphotos.net.

While sanctions will continue to prevent most U.S. companies from dealing with Iran even after the deal is implemented, the accord may result in Europe "regaining its presanction status as Iran's biggest trading partner and restoring what were once $32 billion of economic links," wrote BloombergBusiness in an article published on Sept. 3. China filled that void as EU exports tapered off, becoming Iran's biggest trading partner in 2013, reported BloombergBusiness.

Although it may not rival the scope of other business deals in the making with Iran, it's still worth noting that Messe Düsseldorf, which organizes the massive K show as well as a portfolio of other international trade fairs for the plastics and rubber sector, today announced a partnership with the Iranian National Petrochemical Company for the Iran Plast trade fair. The partnership will take effect with the 2016 event, which is scheduled for April 13 to 17 in Tehran. Messe Düsseldorf will be responsible for international exhibitor participation.

Iran Plast, which takes place every two years, has established itself in 10 years as the country's most important platform for the plastics and rubber industry, according to Messe Düsseldorf. In 2014, the event welcomed 800 exhibitors, 250 of which came from outside Iran, and 68,000 visitors. Iran Plast is supported by the Iran Trade Promotion Organization and the Iran International Exhibition Co.

That perspective meshes with the broader view of Haleh Esfandiari, an Iranian-American scholar who was imprisoned in Iran in 2007 and now resides in Washington, DC. She was interviewed recently on NPR, offering the outlines of what journalist Steve Inskeep called the "modest hope scenario" for the future of Iran in the context of the nuclear deal.

"People [in Iran] are expecting an improvement in the economy," said Esfandiari. "People are expecting a lowering in the cost of living. People are expecting more access to the outside world, especially the younger generation are expecting access to employment. They hope that there will be a lot of foreign investment as a result, leading to a lot of jobs."

About the Author(s)

Norbert Sparrow

Editor in chief of PlasticsToday since 2015, Norbert Sparrow has more than 30 years of editorial experience in business-to-business media. He studied journalism at the Centre Universitaire d'Etudes du Journalisme in Strasbourg, France, where he earned a master's degree.

www.linkedin.com/in/norbertsparrow

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