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Pennsylvania moldmaker/molder Pasco Tool & Plastics expands

Pasco Tool & Plastics is growing quickly and successfully. To accommodate that growth, the company initiated a 12,000-ft2 addition that is about 90% complete. The expansion will almost double the company’s manufacturing square footage, and also includes a class 100,000 clean room for molding and assembly.

Clare Goldsberry

February 7, 2011

2 Min Read
Pennsylvania moldmaker/molder Pasco Tool & Plastics expands

Pasco Tool & Plastics is growing quickly and successfully. To accommodate that growth, the company initiated a 12,000-ft2 addition that is about 90% complete. The expansion will almost double the company’s manufacturing square footage, and also includes a class 100,000 clean room for molding and assembly.
   
According to Ron Posego, project/sales manager for Pasco, the clean room will contain one molding press and an assembly operation for a specific project for a medical customer. “Our plans call for us to add one more press in the clean room and an additional three presses in the general molding area over the next 18 months,” Posego says, adding that the presses will be electric presses but the brand hasn’t been determined. The company currently operates some Roboshot electric presses.
   
Currently, Pasco operateds 12 presses ranging from 33-330 tons clamping force, and has 54 employees. Pasco recently added a new Plastics Engineering Manager/VP of Molding Operations, Jeff Passilla, who is also the son of Pasco’s founder, Tony Passilla Sr. Passilla started Pasco in 1972 and continues to be involved in the day-to-day operations. Tony Passilla Jr. is Pasco’s operations manager.
   
Posego explains that the company is also implementing Design for Assembly (DFA) and Work Flow Design techniques for its assembly/secondary operations. “We have over 25 components that require assembly and second operations, from simple inserting and painting, to complex assemblies, packaging and ship-to-stock for several customers,” he says.   
   
DFA is a method of setting up the production floor so that everything required for the work is in one area. “Employees don’t have to walk around and pick up things from various areas,” Posego notes. “They do this in a lot of the companies we deal with and it’s pretty efficient. It’s similar to lean manufacturing—we’re replacing the lean manufacturing concept with new ideas and making the work flow more efficient.”
   
Posego says that the plastics industry in the Meadville area is turning the corner. “It’s good to see things coming alive around here again,” he comments. “There are a lot of small tool shops—small one-, two-man shops—starting back up. Everyone is busy and we all work together to help each other. The smaller shops help us out quite a bit when we get busy so we don’t have to hire more people. We all have to learn to work together.” —Clare Goldsberry

About the Author(s)

Clare Goldsberry

Until she retired in September 2021, Clare Goldsberry reported on the plastics industry for more than 30 years. In addition to the 10,000+ articles she has written, by her own estimation, she is the author of several books, including The Business of Injection Molding: How to succeed as a custom molder and Purchasing Injection Molds: A buyers guide. Goldsberry is a member of the Plastics Pioneers Association. She reflected on her long career in "Time to Say Good-Bye."

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