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Lights, camera, plastics—part 4

The opening sequence of Stanley Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange, starting with an extreme close-up of Alex (Malcolm McDowell) with a slow reveal of the Korova milk bar where he and his droogs hang, is one of the most stunning in film history. As the camera pulls back, you discover seemingly plastic female figures that serve as furniture.

The opening sequence of Stanley Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange, starting with an extreme close-up of Alex (Malcolm McDowell) with a slow reveal of the Korova milk bar where he and his droogs hang, is one of the most stunning in film history. As the camera pulls back, you discover seemingly plastic female figures that serve as furniture.

Inspired by the works of British pop artist Allen Jones, who turned down a request from Kubrick to design the set, the figures were sculpted by Liz Moore, who had previously created the star child for Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Although the sculptures probably are not made of plastic, most filmgoers perceive them as such. Many other props and objets d'art in the film share this plastic sheen, a key aspect in the set design of this disturbing and provocative masterpiece.

Next slide  From 2002: A story that never happened from a file that doesn't exist

Clockwork Orange

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