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Laser nanocoating technology modifies surfaces of heat-sensitive materials

An advanced ultra-short pulsed laser deposition (USPLD) nanocoating technology that can modify the surface properties of medical devices without changing the underlying material properties and biomechanical functionality has been awarded its 18th patent. Seven of those patents for Picodeon's Coldab US PLD technology came in 2013, with 60 more pending. The most recent, Patent No. 8,486,073, focuses on the technology, processes, and products.

PlasticsToday Staff

August 14, 2013

2 Min Read
Laser nanocoating technology modifies surfaces of heat-sensitive materials

An advanced ultra-short pulsed laser deposition (USPLD) nanocoating technology that can modify the surface properties of medical devices without changing the underlying material properties and biomechanical functionality has been awarded its 18th patent. Seven of those patents for Picodeon's Coldab US PLD technology came in 2013, with 60 more pending. The most recent, Patent No. 8,486,073, focuses on the technology, processes, and products.

Key to Coldab and its applicability to plastics: the coating technology enables clean and particle-free deposition on heat-sensitive substrate materials, such as plastics and even paper, allowing them to be coated at low temperatures.Picodeon-DLCcoatingonSiwafer_resized.JPG

Picodeon US PLDA

A Picodeon spokesperson told PlasticsToday that the US PLD technology could be applied for molds and mold components, including in release coatings and for wear and corrosion resistance.

In terms of plastics applications, US PLD technology has successfully been used with PMMA, polycarbonate, polyimide, PDMS, and PTFE as a coating material, according to the spokesperson.

By focusing the energy of a picosecond laser pulse to a single spot on the target, there is little or no heat transfer to the rest of the target material. Taking place inside a vacuum chamber with tightly focused high-power laser pulses, the thin-film deposition process vaporizes material via laser-ablation, forming a plasma plume that condenses on the substrate to create a thin film.

Potential medical applications include:

  • Orthopedic implants

  • Tooth implants

  • Stents

  • Surgical instruments

  • Orthodontic appliance

  • Dental instruments

  • Cell culture petri disc

Coating materials include:

  • Nicanite brand carbon nitride and composites (CN-Si) from Finnish firm Carbodeon

  • DLC (diamond like carbon)

  • TiN

  • TiO2

In August, Picodeon received a €5 million investment by Enso Ventures Ltd., in addition to starting a new project funded by the Finnish Funding Agency for Technology and Innovation, valued at more than €1 million. Picodeon is investing nearly €2 million in the development of new automated thin-film coating equipment which it expects to be up and running by January 2014.

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