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Polysulfone replaces two titanium medical device components

The new design of an implantable catheter port developed in Italy replaces two of three titanium components with polysulfone (PSU) from Solvay Specialty Polymers (Alpharetta, GA).

PlasticsToday Staff

June 13, 2013

2 Min Read
Polysulfone replaces two titanium medical device components

The new design of an implantable catheter port developed in Italy replaces two of three titanium components with polysulfone (PSU) from Solvay Specialty Polymers (Alpharetta, GA).

The Healthport catheter port system from a company called Plan 1 Health is used for delivery of drugs, antibiotics, and nutrient therapies. Use of the PSU medical plastics in the catheter port saves money and

reduces weight of the three-piece assembly.

A housing and ring component are now made of injection molded PSU. A titanium chamber is fixed between the two plastic components that are ultrasonically welded together. Use of titanium for the inner chamber avoids damages induced by the needle tip and avoids interactions between PSU and the drug, according to Alessandro Rainis, product manager for Plan 1 Health.

A large self-sealing septum facilitates location during skin palpation and reduces the risk of puncture concentration. A transparent polyurethane connector allows a rapid, safe, and reversible connection of the catheter, and a titanium inner chamber,

Solvay describes Eviva PSU as a transparent polymer that offers toughness and strong biocompatibility. The material maintains its dimensional tolerance right out of the mold and requires no machining, according to Shawn Shorrock, global healthcare market manager for Solvay Specialty Polymers. It is a rigid thermoplastic that doesn't absorb fluids and is artifact-free for effective MRI imaging.

The catheter ports--sold to medical device distributors in Europe, Asia, and India--have earned the CE (Conformité Européenne) mark which demonstrates compliance with numerous EC directives, enabling the product to be sold throughout the Euro region. Plan 1 Health may also seek 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) and enter the U.S. market.

Manufacturing operations at Plan1 Health include injection molding, blister thermoforming, ultrasound welding, laser marking, and assembly of plastic and metallic components in a cleanroom ISO 7 (class 10,000).

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