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Functionalize Inc. (Seattle, WA) began shipping what it calls the world's most conductive 3D-printing filament earlier this month. It is said to be the first plastic filament that enables 3D printing of circuit boards, flashlights, lighted wearables and a host of other products.

Norbert Sparrow

April 13, 2015

1 Min Read
The 3D-printing medical breakthroughs of the year (so far): Functionalize

Functionalize Inc. (Seattle, WA) began shipping what it calls the world's most conductive 3D-printing filament earlier this month. It is said to be the first plastic filament that enables 3D printing of circuit boards, flashlights, lighted wearables and a host of other products.

Although medical applications are at the idea stage, that hasn't stopped company founder and CEO Mike Toutonghi from suggesting some possible directions: "Imagine the possibility of today's 3D-printed prosthetics being able to sense pressure through conductive pads in the fingertips."

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About the Author(s)

Norbert Sparrow

Editor in chief of PlasticsToday since 2015, Norbert Sparrow has more than 30 years of editorial experience in business-to-business media. He studied journalism at the Centre Universitaire d'Etudes du Journalisme in Strasbourg, France, where he earned a master's degree.

www.linkedin.com/in/norbertsparrow

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