Sponsored By

A new piece of laser micromachining system, the RapidX250 was designed to help processors and manufacturers with the micro-fabrication of microfluidics, MEMs and medical devices. The manufacturer of the unit, Resonetics, figures target users will be universities and corporate research facilities that have a need to fabricate such devices in a rapid prototype fashion with tolerances approaching 1 micron.

PlasticsToday Staff

August 24, 2011

1 Min Read
Unit speeds rapid prototyping of medical devices

A new piece of laser micromachining system, the RapidX250 was designed to help processors and manufacturers with the micro-fabrication of microfluidics, MEMs and medical devices. The manufacturer of the unit, Resonetics, figures target users will be universities and corporate research facilities that have a need to fabricate such devices in a rapid prototype fashion with tolerances approaching 1 micron.

NF_0817_medical_RapidX250.jpg

Compared with other lasers and methods, the RapidX250 is very flexible, claims Resonetics, able to micro-fabricate 2‐D (flat sheets, tubes) and 3‐D parts (balloons, non‐planar surfaces), including XYZ, theta and goniometer. At 193-nm laser wavelength, the laser can cleanly ablate fluropolymers (such as nylon, Pebax elastomer, Teflon), bioabsorbable polymers and glass. The system has a quick exchange scheme to allow the user to switch to a 248-nm laser wavelength for machining polymers, ceramic and metals (such as stents).

Traditionally MEMs devices are fabricated by traditional semiconductor lithography but this multi‐step process is not rapid. The RapidX250 uses a multi‐wavelength excimer laser (193nm and 248nm) to directly fabricate the structures in a single step.

A DXF file‐to‐CNC converter converts concepts into prototypes, making it relatively easy to implement even in a multi‐user environment.

Resonetics (Nashua, NH) is the largest supplier of laser micromachining products and services, and claims to have the largest independent plastic laser micromachining facility with more than 50 UV‐based laser micromachining systems and with three clean rooms.

Sign up for the PlasticsToday NewsFeed newsletter.

You May Also Like