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Compressed air savings drop straight to bottom line

Connell Industries Inc. (Rahway, NJ) says PET packaging processors retrofitting existing stretch blowmolding systems with the Technoplan Engineering System, an air recovery system (ARS) from Connell, are conserving on energy, slashing their electric bills and reducing the need for investing in new air compressors. To date, approximately 350 systems have been installed in PET bottling plants worldwide. The cycle time of blowmolding machines is not affected after the ARS is installed.

December 2, 2008

1 Min Read
Compressed air savings drop straight to bottom line

Connell Industries Inc. (Rahway, NJ) says PET packaging processors retrofitting existing stretch blowmolding systems with the Technoplan Engineering System, an air recovery system (ARS) from Connell, are conserving on energy, slashing their electric bills and reducing the need for investing in new air compressors. To date, approximately 350 systems have been installed in PET bottling plants worldwide. The cycle time of blowmolding machines is not affected after the ARS is installed. The ARS also decreases noise and potentially saves on space due to improved compressor efficiencies.

Compressed air recovery and reuse is a method of extending the use of air compressors and/or reducing the demand on air compressors. In PET stretch blowmolding applications, air compressors produce excess air, which is usually exhausted into the atmosphere. Even though it is at a lower pressure than primary compressed air, if that excess air can be recovered and recycled to the plant’s low-pressure system, it can be used anywhere needed within a facility. This allows some compressors to rest, resulting in savings in energy and maintenance expenses.

The Technoplan Engineering System can be installed on most blowmolding machines on the market, including older models, reports Connell. During the molds exhaust phase, residual low-pressure compressed air is directed to a recovery tank. Although at a lower pressure (typically 120-170 psi), the residual compressed air is available for secondary applications such as conveyors or can be directed to injection molding machines.    

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