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Davis-Standard LLC and MuCell Extrusion LLC have combined their equipment and expertise, and the result is a new advance in environmentally sound, microcellular foam-based extrusion. David-Standard’s tandem foam extrusion equipment paired with MuCell’s carbon dioxide gas injection system enables production of foams in widths up to 52 inches (1.320mm) in a cleaner, more cost-effective manner.

Clare Goldsberry

July 9, 2010

2 Min Read
Davis-Standard and MuCell Extrusion team up at Zotefoams

Davis-Standard LLC and MuCell Extrusion LLC have combined their equipment and expertise, and the result is a new advance in environmentally sound, microcellular foam-based extrusion. David-Standard’s tandem foam extrusion equipment paired with MuCell’s carbon dioxide gas injection system enables production of foams in widths up to 52 inches (1.320mm) in a cleaner, more cost-effective manner.
   
First to implement this new foamed extrusion technology is Zotefoams plc, a manufacturer of sheet foams. The system was recently installed at Zotefoams’ facility in Croyden, UK, to produce high-end foams using a variety of polymers including low-density polyethylene (LDPE) materials, polypropylene (PP) and nylon (PA). (Ed: For our original report, click here.)
   

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Drivers for the new technology are high polymer costs and desire for a reduced carbon footprint through minimized polymer usage, said Mark Lindenfelzer, President of MuCell Extrusion. “We are working on applications that reduce the polymer content of solid or near-solid parts,” said Lindenfelzer.
   
Davis-Standard’s foam systems, typically used with hydrocarbon blowing agents, have integrated well with atmospheric gas processes such as MuCell’s. The versatility of Davis-Standard’s systems supports greater outputs with reduced energy requirements. This versatility combined with MuCell’s technology has resulted in foams with outstanding property performance and aesthetics. MuCell’s products have a microcellular structure under 100 microns, resulting in 10 times more cells per unit of volume than traditional structures. In addition to improved quality, this technology is cleaner and less expensive to produce than hydrocarbon-based processes.
   
“Microcellular foam is an excellent choice for thermoforming applications where top-load and impact properties are critical,” said Lindenfelzer. “Thermoforming of microcellular foam allows maximum weight reduction while retaining impact qualities and surface quality in applications like dairy containers, yogurt cups and other packaging applications.”
   
Lindenfelzer added that from an environmental and cost standpoint, using atmospheric gases is the technology of the future. It is cleaner, less expensive to produce and does not require the added investment risk associated with handling, storing and utilizing hydrocarbon agents. And, since no cross-linking is required, foams made with this technology are also recyclable. —Clare Goldsberry

About the Author(s)

Clare Goldsberry

Until she retired in September 2021, Clare Goldsberry reported on the plastics industry for more than 30 years. In addition to the 10,000+ articles she has written, by her own estimation, she is the author of several books, including The Business of Injection Molding: How to succeed as a custom molder and Purchasing Injection Molds: A buyers guide. Goldsberry is a member of the Plastics Pioneers Association. She reflected on her long career in "Time to Say Good-Bye."

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