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Instead of a custom manifold system, remote sensor connections, secondary control of duplex vacuum pumps, and a data cabinet for all of the electronics and power, a new particle measuring system provides a complete central microbial and particle-monitoring system in a central 19-inch rack.

PlasticsToday Staff

September 6, 2011

2 Min Read
Integrated particle and microbial monitoring in a compact, modular design

Instead of a custom manifold system, remote sensor connections, secondary control of duplex vacuum pumps, and a data cabinet for all of the electronics and power, a new particle measuring system provides a complete central microbial and particle-monitoring system in a central 19-inch rack. Particle Measuring Systems (Boulder, CO) describes its FacilityPro as an integrated environmental monitoring system, with a smaller footprint and simple integration for environmental monitoring via on-board analog/digital I/O modules, and simplified system installation and validation.

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Particle Measuring Systems FacilityPro

FacilityPro SCADA software, which is based on GE Proficy iFIX, provides the interface and supervisory control for the system. The GE Proficy iFIX platform provides security and stability with highly configurable screens to meet application-specific needs. Designed for 21 CFR Part 11 compliance, the software features solutions for data mapping, alarm notification, e-signatures, recipe management, configurable reports, and a complete audit trail. The particle monitors can see use in pharmaceutical, nanomaterial, aerospace, integrated circuit, and electronics manufacturing.

Particle Measuring Systems is the global leader in environmental monitoring technology, with nearly 40 years of experience providing solutions for particle and microbial monitoring for companies with clean-room manufacturing environments. The company says its laser-based particle counters, which it invented, now set the standard for particle monitoring.

The FacilityPro system is described as expandable based on your project needs, with the system generally consisting of a processor, particle sensors, microbial collection, and power modules with vacuum control. Laser-based direct imaging is a technique that uses the light emitted by a laser to illuminate an area where particles are passing through. The technique doesn't measure the light blocked by the particles but rather the area of the particles so that it functions like an automated microscope. A pulsed laser diode freezes particle motion, and light transmitted through the fluid is projected onto an electronic camera with macro focusing optics. The particles in the sample will block the light and the resulting silhouettes will be imaged onto the digital camera chip.

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