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This year's wildly successful Lego Movie is mostly digital, but this movie could not exist were it not for the molded ABS bricks that conquered the world.The box-office smash, which was far more creative than anyone had the right to expect, is the latest feather in the cap for the Danish toymaker. The company had been losing money in recent years until 46-year-old Jorgen Vig Knudstorp, a Danish economist, turned things around. Under his leadership, the company recorded a 10% rise in sales in 2013, at a time when the toy market as a whole was slightly shrinking.

Norbert Sparrow

December 11, 2014

1 Min Read
Lights, camera, plastics—part 9

This year's wildly successful Lego Movie is mostly digital, but this movie could not exist were it not for the molded ABS bricks that conquered the world.

The box-office smash, which was far more creative than anyone had the right to expect, is the latest feather in the cap for the Danish toymaker. The company had been losing money in recent years until 46-year-old Jorgen Vig Knudstorp, a Danish economist, turned things around. Under his leadership, the company recorded a 10% rise in sales in 2013, at a time when the toy market as a whole was slightly shrinking. 

So, it's safe to say that your children's children probably will still be playing with Legos, but they may not be made of ABS anymore. The company announced earlier this year that it intends to replace ABS with a sustainable resin by 2030. It currently uses more than 6000 tons of plastic annually, almost three-quarters of which is ABS.

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About the Author(s)

Norbert Sparrow

Editor in chief of PlasticsToday since 2015, Norbert Sparrow has more than 30 years of editorial experience in business-to-business media. He studied journalism at the Centre Universitaire d'Etudes du Journalisme in Strasbourg, France, where he earned a master's degree.

www.linkedin.com/in/norbertsparrow

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