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Polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) resin has been adopted in a head-up displays developed by Continental AG to assist in safe driving. The rigid, temperature resistant Fortron material from Celanese Corporation (Irving, TX) reportedly hits the spot with very narrow tolerances that allow precise dimensions for various components.

PlasticsToday Staff

January 13, 2014

2 Min Read
PPS finds use in auto head-up display

Polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) resin has been adopted in a head-up displays developed by Continental AG to assist in safe driving. The rigid, temperature resistant Fortron material from Celanese Corporation (Irving, TX) reportedly hits the spot with very narrow tolerances that allow precise dimensions for various components.  

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Continental is also working on the next evolutionary step of the head-up display. Larger head-up displays will be the basis for augmented reality functionalities.

Automotive head-up displays include a unit that produces an image and an optical module that redirects the image with speed or navigation information onto a transparent projection surface at the driver's eye level. "The driver receives all the information without taking his eyes or attention off the road - and can respond faster to potentially hazardous situations," the German Automobile Association (ADAC) states in describing the safety and comfort advantages of this technology.

"Our high-performance Fortron 6165A6 PPS is used in bearing housings, the optical rail and in the mirror holder - three areas in which the mechanical properties of the polymer play a decisive role," said Monika Taut, graduate engineer in applications technology, Celanese Transportation Business Unit, in describing the advantages of Fortron PPS.

Fortron 6165A6 PPS is ideal for these components because it offers low warpage characteristics and high dimensional stability over the entire temperature range that ensure the data is accurately presented on the projection surface.

"This grade is reinforced with 65 percent glass and mineral fibers, which leads to considerably reduced creep while improving the strength and stability of the components," explained Taut. "This material also has extremely low moisture absorption, outstanding chemical resistance, is inherently flame retardant and tolerates service temperatures of up to 240 degrees Celsius or 464 degrees Fahrenheit."

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