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PSI-Polymer Systems has reached an out of court settlement with Nordson PPS GmbH on a patent conflict originally filed by Kreyenborg GmbH against PSI in 2012. The original lawsuit alleged that PSI's CSC-BF continuous backflush screen changers infringed Kreyenborg's patents. The suit was filed two weeks prior to the NPE2012.A joint motion to dismiss with prejudice was filed in the U.S. District Court, Western District of North Carolina, Statesville Division on September 5, 2014, stating that both parties had resolved and settled their disputes.

Clare Goldsberry

October 8, 2014

2 Min Read
PSI-Polymer Systems and Nordson reach out of court settlement

PSI-Polymer Systems has reached an out of court settlement with Nordson PPS GmbH on a patent conflict originally filed by Kreyenborg GmbH against PSI in 2012. The original lawsuit alleged that PSI's CSC-BF continuous backflush screen changers infringed Kreyenborg's patents. The suit was filed two weeks prior to the NPE2012.

A joint motion to dismiss with prejudice was filed in the U.S. District Court, Western District of North Carolina, Statesville Division on September 5, 2014, stating that both parties had resolved and settled their disputes.

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PSI-Polymer Systems screen changer  

"We feel vindicated with this settlement, as we always felt the lawsuit was baseless," said Glenn Woodcock, Ppesident of PSI. "We defended ourselves vigorously and are happy to report that our CSF-BF design does not infringe their patent."

While the terms of the agreement remain confidential, PSI is free to continue to market, sell and support its current CSC-BF design around the globe, free from any claim by Nordson or Kreyenborg, according to a news release.

The CSC-BF melt filtration product allows a processor to continue running without shutting down due to contaminants clogging the filter screen. The system automatically purges the materials causing the clog from the system and even switches to a new screen when necessary.

"We always believed strongly that our CSC-BF design did not infringe on Kreyenborg's patent," said Don Macnamara, general manager of PSI. "This was truly a David vs. Goliath situation, but we felt we had to fight - it was a matter of integrity for us. We're pleased with the outcome."

PSI's CSC-BF screen changer design is patent pending, and has 'several features' that make it unique from other screen changers, according to Macnamara. The company plans to aggressively market this product to the fast-growing recycling industry, which is its biggest user.

"Demand for continuous backflush screen changers has grown significantly over the past few years, largely due to the growth of recycling," said Macnamara. "PSI has led, not followed, the growth of this market."

These screen changers originally were used only on reclaim pelletizing lines, and are designed to handle contaminated recycled material. However, they have now become more of a mainstream production product, used on extrusion lines producing finished plastic products, Macnamara explained. "We've perfected the process of filtering out heavy contaminants from reclaimed materials," he said. "Because of this, processors are now confident they can use recycled material blends in their film and sheet, and pipe and profile products."

About the Author(s)

Clare Goldsberry

Until she retired in September 2021, Clare Goldsberry reported on the plastics industry for more than 30 years. In addition to the 10,000+ articles she has written, by her own estimation, she is the author of several books, including The Business of Injection Molding: How to succeed as a custom molder and Purchasing Injection Molds: A buyers guide. Goldsberry is a member of the Plastics Pioneers Association. She reflected on her long career in "Time to Say Good-Bye."

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