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Greenerd Press & Machine Co. (Nashua, NH) said it recently installed three massive, 4000-ton hydraulic compression molding presses at Ashley Industrial Molding (AIM), a sheet molding compound (SMC) processor in Oelwein, IA. Standing 34 ft above and 11 ft below the shop floor, and weighing about 500 metric tons each, this may be the largest compression press installation in North America.

PlasticsToday Staff

December 16, 2009

1 Min Read
Three huge compression presses installed in Iowa

Greenerd Press & Machine Co. (Nashua, NH) said it recently installed three massive, 4000-ton hydraulic compression molding presses at Ashley Industrial Molding (AIM), a sheet molding compound (SMC) processor in Oelwein, IA. Standing 34 ft above and 11 ft below the shop floor, and weighing about 500 metric tons each, this may be the largest compression press installation in North America.

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The machines were built by Tianjin Tianduan Press Co. Ltd. (Tianjin, China), with whom Greenerd has a North American alliance. Greenerd says that for the presses’ vital operational components, American-made parts were imported to China. Machine controls, for example, feature a touchscreen Allen Bradley Industrial PC, Versa View 6181P-12TPXPH, with Windows XP software, providing recipe storage, trending, diagnostics, and Ethernet communication.



Scott Pflughoeft, AIM’s manufacturing VP, commented that “Greenerd had all three presses assembled, installed, and in production in just 60 days.” That followed a journey across the Pacific with the machine components taking 60% of an ocean freighter, a three-barge shipment up the Mississippi River from New Orleans to Dubuque, IA, and 53 semi-trailer trips from Dubuque to Oelwein.



Ashley is a custom molder using compression molding and RIM technology to make components for agricultural, construction, forestry, industrial, and military applications. Greenerd, which is the sole North American representative for Tianduan products, was founded in 1883 and has been designing and building its own hydraulic presses since 1934. —[email protected]

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