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At NPE2015, Werth Messtechnik (Giessen, Germany) will showcase its latest, state-of-the-art TomoScope, a measuring machine that uses x-ray tomography to perform rapid, nondestructive geometrical measurements of the interiors and exteriors of complex components.

March 10, 2015

2 Min Read
Werth TomoScope performs first-part inspections in minutes

X-rays are good for uncovering flaws in many solid bodies that can’t be seen from an external vantage point. For molded parts, some internal features can only be seen if the part undergoes destructive testing, but an x-ray using tomography can give you a lot of information without having to destroy the part.

At NPE2015, Werth Messtechnik (Giessen, Germany) will showcase its latest, state-of-the-art TomoScope, a measuring machine that uses x-ray tomography to perform rapid, nondestructive geometrical measurements of the interiors and exteriors of complex components. The company is at booth S-19086.

Using a high-precision, rotary axis , the Werth TomoScope is able to shoot an x-ray through the part, rotate it slightly and shoot another x-ray until it has gone a full 360° to get the 2D images, which are then reconstructed into a 3D point cloud. Once the point cloud has been created, it goes into the software that Werth developed specifically for the TomoScope.

Werth TomoScope

The measured point clouds can be calibrated with extremely high precision by using the additional integrated tactile or optical sensors. First article parts inspection can be performed in a matter of minutes. As with many manufacturing processes, integrated automated solutions ensure more efficient work in metrology, as well, says Werth. To automate the process of production measurements with the Werth TomoScope, it is now possible to use a pallet system to automatically feed in several identical or different parts.

Werth sees the future of metrology in its multisensor coordinate measuring machine. The traceability of measurement results is provided by a calibration according to coordinate measuring machine standard ISO 10360, which is unique for this kind of instrument, says Werth’s information. The gathered data can be easily exported to STL files for direct machine tool communication or directly imported to the WinWerth 3D CAD module for a graphical nominal-actual comparison in a deviation color plot display or measurement of constructed geometrical elements.

The latest in Werth’s capabilities is rapid reconstruction in x-ray tomography. Increased requirements for greater resolutions when digitizing work pieces can now be met with high-resolution 4,000 x 4,000 pixel detectors. Werth raster tomography can use volumes of 48 gigavoxels in practice. To still be able to process the enormous quantities of data for high-resolution measurements in real time, the reconstruction hardware and software of the TomoScope and TomoCheck machines have been improved. For example, an “in the image” measurement with 40963 voxels can now be done in real time under normal measurement conditions.

For molders and moldmakers alike, this technology allows precise inspection of the entire plastic part or mold component easily and quickly, providing more information faster without destroying the plastic component.

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