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Slideshow: The birth of cool wearable medical devices, part three

You can't talk about wearables without mentioning Google Glass. When it's not causing a melee in a San Francisco dive bar or being pilloried as a pernicious usurper of privacy, the computer masquerading as eyeglasses has been hailed in some quarters for a number of potential medical applications.

You can't talk about wearables without mentioning Google Glass. When it's not causing a melee in a San Francisco dive bar or being pilloried as a pernicious usurper of privacy, the computer masquerading as eyeglasses has been hailed in some quarters for a number of potential medical applications.

Pristine (Austin, TX) is a startup that makes the EyeSight app, which allows medical personnel to transmit live video and audio of patient wounds from Glass to authorized devices. A nurse or doctor will be able to examine the wound remotely and decide whether or not the patient needs to come in. The startup plans to roll out the telemedicine-inspired technology at outpatient wound care clinics soon.

A proof of concept from Philips shows how surgeons could use Glass to monitor a patient's vital signs without taking their eyes off the procedure or patient. A short video explains the concept and shows the possibilities.

Click here to go to the next slide.

Norbert Sparrow

Google Glass

Google Glass

 

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