is part of the Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them. Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

TPV gives auto interiors a softer touch

Promising cushion-like indentation that’s associated with foamed structures, a new high-flow thermoplastic vulcanizate (TPV) also offers cost-reduction opportunities and good surface qualities for automotive interiors.

Promising cushion-like indentation that’s associated with foamed structures, a new high-flow thermoplastic vulcanizate (TPV) also offers cost-reduction opportunities and good surface qualities for automotive interiors.



ExxonMobil's Santoprene TPV M350 provides what the company calls “comfort touch” and good surface qualities for automotive interiors.
ExxonMobil Chemical’s Santoprene TPV 8211-85 M350 reportedly provides low and stable gloss level; high scratch- and mar-resistance; good abrasion and chemical resistance; and low fogging and odor emission. The elastomer is colorable and can be used for door panels, center consoles, lower instrument panels, back seat covers, and B and C pillars.

To achieve “comfort touch,” Santoprene TPV M350 can be processed using two-component injection molding or mono-sandwich molding onto a rigid polypropylene substrate for an unfoamed structure that does not indent. Either way, ExxonMobil Chemical says the result is an over-molded TPV skin with a soft touch. A thermoplastic, the TPV also has what the company calls “sustainability opportunities” because less labor and time are required for production, with reduced scrap and improved recycling. [email protected]
TAGS: Materials
Hide comments
account-default-image

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish