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The week that was: Highlights and the top 10 articles for July 9-13

The internet can spread information with blistering speed, building the presence of a story geometrically in "viral" cases. The problem is, it can send that story to millions of screens, big and small, regardless of whether it's based in fact or not. That's how a fake video purporting to show Coca-Cola's latest product, a bottle-shaped bag for soda consumers in Latin America, found it's way on to some pretty mainstream "news" sites.

The internet can spread information with blistering speed, building the presence of a story geometrically in "viral" cases. The problem is, it can send that story to millions of screens, big and small, regardless of whether it's based in fact or not. That's how a fake video purporting to show Coca-Cola's latest product, a bottle-shaped bag for soda consumers in Latin America, found it's way on to some pretty mainstream "news" sites. Our Packaging Channel Editor, Heather Caliendo, however didn't take the bait and thought it best to ask Coke if the video, with pretty striking production quality (check it out at the link), was in fact true. Coke's answer? Not so much. Heather also reported on a very interesting study out of Michigan State's acclaimed packaging school about how packages influence consumers in the super market and a market research report on how India has only scratched the surface of its plastics potential. Key fact:  Per capita plastics consumption in the U.S.? More than 100 kg; in India? 7.4 kg, and it's still third in global plastics consumption behind only China and the U.S.

Could carbon fibers become a victim of their own success? If the more optimistic forecasts for its future demand come to fruition, the answer is yes, according to Stephen Moore, our automotive/mobility channel editor in a report from the JEC Asia Carbon Fiber Forum in Singapore. At the event, several speakers said demand growth has been outstripping supply expansions. The result: "CF suppliers will need to get a hurry-on if they have any hope of matching this booming demand, otherwise growth may be restrained by lack of supply." Production of a composite automotive body as a one-off custom job is one thing, series production, however, with 40,000 bodies to be built? That's quite another matter. Stephen reported on German supplier Schuler SMG GmbH's plans to do just that, creating a body that's 300 kg lighter than an equivalent steel version.

What do the Kelly Anal Sphincter Dilator, mouth gags, and a skull surgery chain and hook instrument have in common? All three made it into Doug Smock's Medical Musings blog this week, which looked at an offbeat museum collection that really shows how far medical devices have come thanks to the onset of modern manufacturing processes and materials, like plastic. Next time you're in Boston, head to Massachusetts General Hospital's Paul S. Russell Museum of Medical History and Innovation. Doug also spoke with Metro Mold and Design about its expansion plans, fueled by growth in revenue from $4.5 million at its founding in 2000 to more than $50 million today.

A story on hot plastic by Clare Goldsberry generated a great deal of reader interest, with the resin in question not hot in the temperature sense but in the trademarked-goods-boosted-from-the-docks-then-ground-up-and-sold sense. Clare attempted to contact the "recycler" in question, but the phone had been disconnected. Staring legal fees in the face, I guess it makes sense to lose the land line so you can save some cash and lawyer up.

Finally, not a lot of lukewarm feelings around Scientific Molding, proponents and opponents feel quite strongly and readily share their opinions. Robert Gattshall started what became a robust dialogue with his article on 'pushback' or resistance to the process method, triggering a riposte from Bill Tobin and finally a closing shot from Steven Silvey. Robert followed up the scientific molding article with a great nuts-and-bolts break down of whether a part is filled or packed and how the difference is a big deal when you're establishing a process.

Most clicked articles for July 9-13

  1. Hold your soda: Coca-Cola isn't being sold in plastic bags
  2. Do you know the difference between filled and packed?
  3. So. Cal. Plastics recycling stolen products
  4. Why Scientific Molding?
  5. Husky COO discusses new China facility
  6. Reports show manufacturing activity slowing, sluggish job growth
  7. Minnesota molder launches major medical expansion
  8. My scientific molding soapbox, please
  9. Medical Musings: A look beyond the hyperbole on the medical device tax
  10. India poised to become a polymers powerhouse, report says
Most clicked for the Holiday-shortened week of July 2-6

  1. Why reshoring?
  2. Report: Imported PVC packaging sold in retail chains violates state toxic laws
  3. Small Erie molder makes big impact on healthcare recycling
  4. Portola Packaging shuts down cosmetics closure and container manufacturing unit
  5. BPA in packaging: A lucrative past, a controversial present, and a tentative future
  6. Barrier Plastics launches U.S. production of its alternative to fluorinated HDPE
  7. TCI rebuilds after Katrina, finds success in plastic packaging
  8. Companies strive to prove purity of medical plastics
  9. BPA in packaging: Market outlook, PC alternatives, ongoing lawsuits
  10. Polycarbonate/polyester alloy promises ultra-smooth surfaces in auto applications
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