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The contract design and manufacturing company serving medical device OEMs will triple its manufacturing space when the building is operational next year.

Posted by Staff

August 29, 2023

2 Min Read
Harmac Medical plant in Tijuana
Image courtesy of Harmac

Contract design and manufacturing company Harmac Medical Products announced this week that it has built a second facility in Tijuana, Mexico, tripling its manufacturing space. The contract manufacturer of single-use medical devices expects the facility to be up and running no later than mid-2024.

The new 106,000-square-foot facility will include 32,000 square feet devoted to ISO Class 7 and Class 8 cleanrooms, warehousing, engineering offices, and quality management labs to support Harmac’s growing operations. The building will house a full suite of integrated services including design for manufacturability, tooling and automation, and process and product validation, as well as extensive manufacturing capabilities such as injection molding, RF welding, and laser processing, said Harmac.

“We’ve experienced tremendous growth with both existing and new customers and are making ongoing investments to support their current and future needs,” said Harmac President and CEO John Somers in a prepared statement. “Our new facility will provide extra manufacturing capacity for customers who are looking for a dependable, high-quality manufacturing partner in a near-shore location. It will also allow us to offer a complete solution in Mexico, from resin to finished packaged device.”

Headquartered in Buffalo, NY, Harmac has a global footprint with a facility in Castlerea, Ireland, in addition to the Tijuana locations. It has been manufacturing products in Mexico since 1999.

“Our new facility will feature state-of-the-art manufacturing equipment in a brand-new building,” Somers said. “It will be a great place to work, and we look forward to hiring additional associates in a wide range of roles.”

An early adopter of nearshoring for medical device OEMs, Harmac is expanding its presence in Mexico as the practice soars. Supply chain disruption during and after the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic and China’s lockdowns have led companies to reconsider outsourcing across the oceans. In fact, Axios reported recently that the share of companies nearshoring production nearly tripled this year, according to a survey conducted by McKinsey.

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