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Two water-absorbing natural plastics are used by chemicals giant BASF to produce "the ultimate next-generation wrinkle corrector".Wrinkle correction is a crowded field. Google "wrinkle corrector" and you get 168,000 results.

December 3, 2012

1 Min Read
Cross-linked biopolymers attack human wrinkles

Two water-absorbing natural plastics are used by chemicals giant BASF to produce "the ultimate next-generation wrinkle corrector".

Wrinkle correction is a crowded field. Google "wrinkle corrector" and you get 168,000 results.

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Cross-linkled polymers absorb water. (BASF)

The new Filling Spheres cosmetic product is composed of hyaluronic acid of low molecular weight (<40 kDa) and konjac, a polysaccharide of high molecular weight (> 200 kDa). BASF says that cross-linking of both components forms small spheres which, after drying, become Ultra Filling Spheres. Due to their high hygroscopic properties, the volume of the spheres increases as they absorb water from the skin. Plumping the skin from inside out may result in smoothing out the wrinkles and fine lines at the surface of the skin, according to BASF.

Konjac is a perennial plant that grows in China, Taiwan, Japan and southeastern Asia for its large starchy corms or tubers that are used to produce a flour and jelly. It is sometimes used as a vegan substitute for gelatin. It's also used in the Japanese winter stew called oden

The product has been developed by BASF´s cosmetic active ingredient business called Beauty Creations, which was created by the merger of Beauty Care Solutions and Laboratoires Sérobiologiques, which became part of BASF last year.

Wrinkles occur as skin gets thinner, drier and less elastic. Among changes that take place during the aging process, the human body produces less structural skin compounds such as elastin, collagen, and glycosaminoglycans, especially hyaluronic acid.

As a result, the skin surface becomes thinner, losing some of its, flexibility and strength. The result is wrinkles, not the most critical medical issue, but one of significant interest to many people.

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