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Superfos says package is small part of greenhouse picture

Continuing the educational effort it began last year, Denmark-based packaging molder Superfos is striving to show that, since packaging plays only a minor role in a product's total CO2 emissions, the emphasis on it is misplaced. Its CO2 Calculator lets packagers easily figure it out for themselves.

PlasticsToday Staff

February 2, 2010

2 Min Read
Superfos says package is small part of greenhouse picture

Continuing the educational effort it began last year, Denmark-based packaging molder Superfos is striving to show that, since packaging plays only a minor role in a product's total CO2 emissions, the emphasis on it is misplaced. Its CO2 Calculator lets packagers easily figure it out for themselves.

Superfos, which injection molds a variety of food and non-food containers in nine facilities around Europe, last June announced it had produced its own CO2 Calculator, a tool with which anyone can work out the amount of CO2 emissions resulting from any packaging solution. The Calculator is available through Superfos representatives.

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The new Superfos line of SuperLock packaging combines an oxygen barrier on all surfaces plus a membrane seal for longer product shelf life.

Superfos is committed to sustainability and greening within its own organization. The company's communications manager Annette Gottsche says, "The CO2 Calculator helps us to meet the increasing demands for sustainable behavior in the entire manufacturing supply chain. The goal is to reach lower CO2 emissions through green innovations. Though our packaging accounts for only a minor percentage of an average product's total CO2 emission, there is still room for improvements and we are constantly working on them."

The Superfos CO2 Calculator covers the processes influenced by the company, from raw material to its leaving the factory. Users can enter details on raw material, production location, and logistics. The methods of calculation even consider that different countries have different regulations and systems for energy and waste management, adds Gottsche.

During 2009 the Calculator was adjusted to fit the PAS2050 standard and has been certified by Carbon Trust, an independent organization set up by the UK government to support the shift to a low-carbon economy and to develop low-carbon technologies.

Superfos, which announced in late 2009 that it would sell its entire U.S. operation to Berry Plastics, the U.S.-based diversified plastic packaging manufacturer, is practicing what it preaches on sustainability. Its recently announced SuperLock oxygen barrier packaging allows a shelf life of up to 24 months for foodstuff such as cucumber, beets, and cabbage, which is twice or even three times as long as other solutions. The clear packages allow high quality in-mold labeling, and according to Superfos, give the end user the visual impression of glass. —[email protected]

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