Sponsored By

Long a leader in the reclaim of plastic printer cartridges, HP (Palo Alto, CA) has achieved ambitious recycling goals for its printers, introducing a line where 83% of the total plastic weight is made from recycled resins.

MPW Staff

April 6, 2009

2 Min Read
HP and Millet close the loop from printers to hiking gear

NewsFeed_Apr7_HP.jpg

HP's Deskjet D2545 Printer, the company’s first unit made almost entirely from recycled plastics

Long a leader in the reclaim of plastic printer cartridges, HP (Palo Alto, CA) has achieved ambitious recycling goals for its printers, introducing a line where 83% of the total plastic weight is made from recycled resins. In an update of its social and environmental performance goals for fiscal year 2008, HP reported that more than 1.7 billion lb of electronic products were recovered cumulatively. In the same year, it also launched the HP Deskjet D2545 Printer, the company’s first unit made almost entirely from recycled plastics. The line also uses HP 60 ink cartridges molded from recycled resin and its packaging is now 100% recyclable, with the total product packaging reduced by 97%.

Last year, HP recovered 3.5 million hardware units weighing 75 million lb (34,000 tonnes) for reuse. Globally, the company increased its recycling volume to 265 million lb (120,000 tonnes). Since 2005, HP has used more than 32 million lb (14,500 tonnes) of recycled plastic resin in more than 565 million inkjet print cartridges. The company has pledged to triple the use of recycled material in its inkjet products by 2010.

On April 3, global polyamide (PA) producer Rhodia (Lyon, France) and high-mountain equipment Millet announced plans to develop closed loop recycling of PA, converting used mountain climbing rope into engineering plastics for use in mountain sports equipment. The collaboration is part of Rhodia’s 4earth program to develop “closed-loops” for end-of-life recycled polyamide. In a release, Millet said it would work with Rhodia to significantly increase the percentage of recycled materials that go into its products without sacrificing performance. —[email protected]

Sign up for the PlasticsToday NewsFeed newsletter.

You May Also Like