Sponsored By

Shark-skin inspired film repels bacteria

A micro-pattern film designed to inhibit the survival and transfer of bacteria including Staph. a, MRSA, E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and a host of other bacteria that serve as primary culprits for hospital-acquired infections has been licensed for a new line of bacterial inhibition covers for high-touch surfaces in healthcare.

PlasticsToday Staff

July 26, 2011

1 Min Read
Shark-skin inspired film repels bacteria

A micro-pattern film designed to inhibit the survival and transfer of bacteria including Staph. a, MRSA, E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and a host of other bacteria that serve as primary culprits for hospital-acquired infections has been licensed for a new line of bacterial inhibition covers for high-touch surfaces in healthcare. LGI, an advanced labeling manufacturer, is bringing Sharklet Technologies Inc.'s bacterial inhibition covers to market via its Tactivex product line. The Sharklet pattern inhibits bacterial survival and reduces transfer of bacteria to hands when touched, and as its name suggest, its biomimetic inspiration comes from sharkskin.

Sharklet (top) seeks to mimic shark skin (bottom).

The antimicrobial Sharklet surface is comprised of millions of diamonds arranged in a distinct pattern that mimics the microbe-resistant properties of shark skin. Sharklet Technologies puts the pattern into adhesive-backed films and then manufactures the pattern into medical devices and consumer goods to prevent bacteria growth.

The Tactivex product line will feature covers for the surfaces that leading microbiologists at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control have identified as critical for keeping clean, including patient bed rails, overbed tray tables, bedside tables, staff call handsets, patient room light switches and door levers. The Tactivex line will also feature a product for nurse stations and areas that serve as pivot points of activity between patient room visits.

LGInternational says its Tactivex film utilizing Sharklet technology creates a "cleanliness safety net" that is extremely difficult to achieve in settings where surfaces cannot be sanitized after every contamination.

Sign up for the PlasticsToday NewsFeed newsletter.

You May Also Like