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Many companies are looking for ways to adopt sustainable practices and materials into their manufacturing, and a new environmentally friendly biopolymer from custom compounder Rotuba (Linden, NJ) doesn’t rely on oil or food as its base material. The Naturacell bioresin has a cellulose base, which is derived from sustainable trees and cotton planted and harvested specifically for making this material. Very little is wasted during cellulose conversion, with the bark of the trees used for fuel.

Amie Chitwood

November 10, 2008

2 Min Read
Wood-based polymer helps achieve green initiatives

Many companies are looking for ways to adopt sustainable practices and materials into their manufacturing, and a new environmentally friendly biopolymer from custom compounder Rotuba (Linden, NJ) doesn’t rely on oil or food as its base material. The Naturacell bioresin has a cellulose base, which is derived from sustainable trees and cotton planted and harvested specifically for making this material. Very little is wasted during cellulose conversion, with the bark of the trees used for fuel. And since cellulose has been used in manufacturing for more than 50 years, it eliminates the risks associated with processing unproven biopolymers.

“Consumer demand for environmentally friendly products is growing rapidly and manufacturers have been struggling to find a more efficient, affordable way to capture this opportunity,” says Adam Bell, president of Rotuba. “Naturacell provides the perfect solution because unlike many green polymers, it can be processed with existing equipment.”

Naturacell doesn’t require special tooling or capital investment, and it can be reprocessed, recycled, and reused in most applications. Physical property benefits include tough impact strength, superior clarity, strong chemical resistance, and a high surface gloss. And it is also said to be warm to the touch, making it suitable for a wide range of consumer products including toys, hair accessories, kitchen accessories, and cell phones.

It is also a vehicle to incorporate additives that require breathability such as antimicrobial agents, fragrances, and insect repellents. Rotuba says that, when compared to other leading biopolymers, it rates higher in transparency, temperature resistance, shipping capability, and sustainability (using plants rather than a food base) than most of its competitors, but it isn’t priced the highest. And when factoring in the difficulty of processing other biomaterials compared to Naturacell, it offers a cost-effective choice for consumers wanting products made with sustainable resources.

Rotuba
www.naturacellnow.com

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