Jomar to debut ‘entry-level’ injection blow molding machine at K 2019

Jomar Corp. (Egg Harbor Township, NJ), a global manufacturer of injection blow molding (IBM) machinery for the pharmaceutical, healthcare and household products industries, announced the launch of a new “entry-level” IBM machine for first-time processors. The Model 25 machine will replace the Model 20, which will now be discontinued. Jomar will highlight the new equipment at K 2019 in booth A 32 in hall 14.

Jomar Model 25 injection blow molding machine

“We’ve found that customers wanted a Jomar, but they either didn’t have the capital required for our larger machines or couldn’t meet their annual volume requirements with our Model 20,” said company President Carlos Castro. “The need to provide a high-quality, high-volume machine at a lower price point drove the development of the Model 25.” Jomar has already sold its first machine to a cosmetics company.

The Model 25 has the same compact footprint as the Model 20 but features greater clamp tonnage and a casting area that allows handling of larger bottles and provides increased cavitation. The machine has 21 tons of clamp tonnage on the preform clamp plus five tons on the blow clamp. It is capable of production runs that exceed industry expectations, said Jomar. The machine can mold bottles up to six inches high and almost four inches in diameter. Previously, bottles of this size had to run on larger machines, which greatly increased the capital requirements.

Ron Gabriele, Sales Manager, explained the key benefits of the Model 25 to first-time IBM processors: “We’re able to provide a robust Jomar machine that is far less expensive than our next larger machine without sacrificing the quality and durability for which Jomar is known. It is also ideally sized to handle large runs of small bottles or smaller runs of large bottles.”

Based on 6,000 hours of annual production, the Model 25 can manufacture 10-ml eye dropper vials at a rate of 16 million per year. The machine can also produce 500-ml tablet bottles at a rate of 1.2 million per year.

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