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Jaguar Land Rover trials chemical recycling process

Jaguar Land Rover trials chemical recycling process
The automaker partners with BASF in a pilot research project which aims to tackle the challenges of plastic waste. ChemCycling project takes plastic waste and recycles it into premium material for potential use in future Jaguar and Land Rover models.

Jaguar Land Rover is trialing a chemical recycling process which converts plastic waste into a new premium grade material that could feature on future vehicles. Working in conjunction with BASF, Jaguar Land Rover is part of a pilot project called ChemCycling that upcycles domestic waste plastic, otherwise destined for landfill or incinerators, into new high-quality material.

Jaguar Land Rover is investigating the use of resin derived from chemically-recycled feedstocks in a front-end carrier overmolding.

BASF’s  ChemCycling process transforms waste plastic into pyrolysis oil using a thermochemical route. This secondary raw material is then fed into BASF’s production chain as a replacement for fossil resources; ultimately producing a new premium grade that replicates the high quality and performance of ‘virgin’ plastics.  Importantly, it can be tempered and colored making it the ideal sustainable solution for designing the next-generation dashboards and exterior-surfaces in Jaguar and Land Rover models.

Jaguar Land Rover and BASF are currently testing the pilot phase material in a Jaguar I-PACE prototype front-end carrier overmolding to verify it meets the same stringent safety requirements of the existing original part. The part uses a polyamide grade called Ultramid® B3WG6 Ccycled Black 00564.

Pending the outcome of the trials and progression in taking chemical recycling to market readiness, adoption of the new premium material would mean Jaguar Land Rover could use domestically derived recycled plastic content throughout its cars without any compromise to quality or safety performance**.

Chris Brown, Senior Sustainability Manager at Jaguar Land Rover, said: “Plastics are vital to car manufacturing and have proven benefits during their use phase, however, plastic waste remains a major global challenge. Solving this issue requires innovation and joined-up thinking between regulators, manufacturers, and suppliers.

“At Jaguar Land Rover, we are proactively increasing recycled content in our products, removing single-use plastics across our operations and reducing excess waste across the product lifecycle. The collaboration with BASF is just one way in which we are advancing our commitment to operating in a circular economy.”

This is the latest example of Jaguar Land Rover’s commitment to addressing the challenge of waste plastic. The company has collaborated with Kvadrat to offer customers alternative seat options that are both luxurious and sustainable.  The high-quality material, available initially on the Range Rover Velar and Range Rover Evoque, combines a durable wool blend with a technical suede cloth that is made from 53 recycled plastic bottles per vehicle.

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